In The Name Of God The Most Merciful, Most Compassionate

All Security and Privacy

Mar16

Reactions to New Zealand terror attacks

By: Marissa Melton Source: VOA News The anti-Muslim attacks on the tiny island nation of New Zealand caught the local population by surprise. “This is something that is completely out of the blue,” said Chelsea Daniels of Newstalk BZ, a radio station based in Auckland. “We hear of these kinds of extremists over the ditch in Australia, popping up now and again. But we’ve experienced really nothing like this here in New Zealand, which is why people are so shocked,” she told VOA in a phone interview. She said overseas events may have sparked the desire of the suspect — identified in news reports as Brenton Tarrant from Grafton, New South Wales, Australia — to mount this attack, “but he has...

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Feb22

Dealing with Islamophobia across Europe

By: Amina Easat-Daas Source: The Conversaion A growing body of research points to the proliferation of Islamophobia across Europe in recent years. In the UK, record numbers of Islamophobic hate crimes were recorded in 2017, and across the continent there have been similar findings on the growth of explicit Islamophobia. In a new, pan-European research project, my colleagues and I set about to devise a toolkit that can be used to counter Islamophobia. It summarises a range of the best methods and tools we saw being used to challenge Islamophobic thought and actions in Europe. In any discussion about Islamphobia, a definition is required that...

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Feb13

UK: New law could mean 15 years prison for wrong click

By: Lizzie Dearden Source: The Independent Anyone who views terrorist propaganda once online can be jailed for up to 15 years under new laws that have sparked human rights concerns. MPs had urged the government to scrap plans to criminalise viewing “information useful to a person committing or preparing an act of terrorism”, which goes further than much-used laws that made physically collecting, downloading or disseminating the material illegal. A United Nations inspector accused the government of straying towards “thought crime” with the proposal, which originally stated that people would have to access propaganda “on three or more different occasions” to commit a terror...

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