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What Is Wrong With " Assalamu Alaikum "


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#1 rami

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Posted 16 March 2005 - 09:53 PM

Bi ismillahir rahmanir raheem

assalamu alaikum

What is wrong with "Assalamu Alaikum"?

for some time now i have noticed every time i say asslamu alaikum to some muslims they choke when they hear it and when replying with alaikum assalam. Some even interprate it in some sick political way like i'm trying to play polotics with them since it is afirming ones faith in front of other people, if you dont say it to them the next time to save them the embaresment of chocking when they reply they get upset like i just told them they are not religious. Some people dont even answer when you say it directly to them and say something like "marhaba". I am not talking about bad muslims these people would generally be considered average by our standards.

This is realy a sick state of affairs, it is a sin not to reply with "alaikum assalam".

Edited by rami, 16 March 2005 - 09:54 PM.

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#2 Fallible

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Posted 16 March 2005 - 10:19 PM

Maybe it just isn't a habit that they are used to out side of the home...
I know I say it at home and to cousins, but i pick up the phone with a hello and i greet friends at uni with a hello... all without noticing.... I doubt it woul dbe that offensive if someone corrected me thought and said salams.
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#3 Niche

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Posted 16 March 2005 - 11:09 PM

well if you say it to a person of the opposite gender, in the shafi'i and hanafi schools, it is not obligatory to reply aloud and actually discouraged, and rather replying without to ones self is the reccomended act.

If you have said it to a group, then only one person replying lifts the burden from the others as it is only a communal obligation to reply. But if none reply then it becomes a personal obligation.

If you are saying it to a person on their own, then I see where you are coming from, but your greeting is for Allah, not them or yourself, so you shouldn't be upset if they don't reply. If you keep your side of the bargain up, you may eventually even if it is a year later imbibe a sense of shame in them and change them.

I understand how you feel though because I would think the same way before.

Its not worth fussing over though
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#4 rami

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Posted 19 March 2005 - 10:58 PM

Bi ismillahir rahmanir raheem

assalamu alaikum

Maybe it just isn't a habit that they are used to out side of the home...
I know I say it at home and to cousins, but i pick up the phone with a hello and i greet friends at uni with a hello... all without noticing.... I doubt it woul dbe that offensive if someone corrected me thought and said salams.

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believe me brother some people have real trouble saying it.


well if you say it to a person of the opposite gender, in the shafi'i and hanafi schools, it is not obligatory to reply aloud and actually discouraged, and rather replying without to ones self is the reccomended act.


I did not know that, but unfortunately i am not talking about women, actualy i dont remember having such troubles with women it is mainly men.



If you are saying it to a person on their own, then I see where you are coming from, but your greeting is for Allah, not them or yourself, so you shouldn't be upset if they don't reply. If you keep your side of the bargain up, you may eventually even if it is a year later imbibe a sense of shame in them and change them.

I understand how you feel though because I would think the same way before.

Its not worth fussing over though


you are right akhi, the only time i get upset is when they think i am using it as tool for something. i dont like seeing bad in people and this is obvious. you know there is a hadith on this exact situation were no one will say or reply to the salam.

khair insha allah.

assalamu alaikum :)

Edited by rami, 19 March 2005 - 10:59 PM.

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#5 canbSISTA

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Posted 19 March 2005 - 11:21 PM

Asalamu Alaykom,

Subhanallah. This actually happened to me today.
Being from canberra you dont see many muslims around, so i get excited when i see fellow muslims. I was shoppiing today, when a lady with the hijab was passing me. i said Asalam Alaykom and got a dirty look from her. My dad saw how i got rejected and replied for me :P i love my daddy....now i feel wanted again :dance:

But i can see where u're coming and i also agree with Niche's comment...

If you are saying it to a person on their own, then I see where you are coming from, but your greeting is for Allah, not them or yourself, so you shouldn't be upset if they don't reply.



Peace
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#6 Astral

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Posted 20 March 2005 - 12:19 AM

Assalamu'alaykum,

I guess as mentioned, some people aren't used to hearing it outside of their homes. Or maybe they just don't know how to react when a stranger unexpectedly gives them salam. I know that when somebody gives me salam, it takes a while for me to register it because when i'm walking about, i'm usually half daydreaming, lol.

I don't know about the 'more religiousity' thing though. Do you say it very loudly or something ?? Like "ASSALAAAMU ALAAAIKUMMM!" or something? I don't know why somebody would say you are trying to behave all religious... who are yuo saying it to anyway?

I remember about a month ago, I was in the reject shop and i came face to face with a fully covered sister, with niqab etc... she was just going to pass me so i said assalamu alaikum to her but she didn't reply. I guess some people prefer to mind their own business and arent used to the habit of saying it left and right. Personally it takes me a few minutes to think before I say it....

anyhow....
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#7 oms

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Posted 20 March 2005 - 12:45 AM

Bi ismillahir rahmanir raheem
believe me brother some people have real trouble saying it.


considering 90% of the people i have prayed behind cant even say salam properly i know what you mean.

remember peoples assalamu 3alaikum (a at the front of assalamu) or if youre really lazy and want to miss the 'a' out salamun alaikum.

salamu alaikum[I] wont suffice.

semantics i know but were talking about 10 hasanat here...

and allah ta3aala knows best
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#8 rami

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Posted 20 March 2005 - 12:45 AM

Bi ismillahir rahmanir raheem

I don't know why somebody would say you are trying to behave all religious... who are yuo saying it to anyway?


i say it normaly maybe even a little low but clear enough, and mainly to people i know or who i meet through other people. I dont often say it to strangers, they are not who i am talking about.


semantics i know but were talking about 10 hasanat here...


i think the worst i've gotten is simply "salamz".

Edited by rami, 20 March 2005 - 12:47 AM.

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#9 Sam

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Posted 20 March 2005 - 05:49 AM

considering 90% of the people i have prayed behind cant even say salam properly i know what you mean.

remember peoples assalamu 3alaikum (a at the front of assalamu) or if youre really lazy and want to miss the 'a' out salamun alaikum.

salamu alaikum[I] wont suffice.

semantics i know but were talking about 10 hasanat here...

and allah ta3aala knows best

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Insha'Allah brother they are saying the alif softly and you just can't hear it.

salaams
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#10 Astral

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Posted 20 March 2005 - 11:34 AM

remember peoples assalamu 3alaikum (a at the front of assalamu) or if youre really lazy and want to miss the 'a' out salamun alaikum.


umm...
051.025
Ith dakhaloo AAalayhi faqaloo salaman qala salamun qawmun munkaroona
YUSUFALI: Behold, they entered his presence, and said: "Peace!" He said, "Peace!" (and thought, "These seem) unusual people."


006.054
YUSUFALI: When those come to thee who believe in Our signs, Say: "Peace be on you: Your Lord hath inscribed for Himself (the rule of) mercy: verily, if any of you did evil in ignorance, and thereafter repented, and amend (his conduct), lo! He is Oft-forgiving, Most Merciful.

Transliteration
6:54.
Wa-itha jaaka allatheena yu/minoona bi-ayatina faqul salamun AAalaykum kataba rabbukum AAala nafsihi alrrahmata annahu man AAamila minkum soo-an bijahalatin thumma taba min baAAdihi waaslaha faannahu ghafoorun raheemun


I don't think there's a need to be pedantic. People have different accents but what they mean is the same.
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#11 Siham

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Posted 20 March 2005 - 01:03 PM

As-salaam Alaikum first of all :lol: ,

I think body language is very important when given salaams especially a bright smile and eye contact is essential. So, please remember that there is no need to rise your voice :wacko: when giving salaams, I personally find it a bit rude on some occasions ;)

wa'as-salam.
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#12 oms

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Posted 20 March 2005 - 02:59 PM

Transliteration
6:54.
Wa-itha jaaka allatheena yu/minoona bi-ayatina faqul salamun AAalaykum kataba rabbukum AAala nafsihi alrrahmata annahu man AAamila minkum soo-an bijahalatin thumma taba min baAAdihi waaslaha faannahu ghafoorun raheemun
I don't think there's a need to be pedantic. People have different accents but what they mean is the same.

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thats right, if you want to drop the a say (as metioned in the quran) salamUN alaikum...not salamu alaikum (i mentioned this in my previous post, you have also quoted it).

to say salamu alaikum is just plain wrong and really makes no sense in arabic.

i dont want to go into the reason we should say it correctly but it would suffice to say that your going through all that trouble to say salms, you might as well say it properly.

my post wasnt intended to attack people, rather it was to bring it to peoples attention especially when in some madhaahib to say salms correctly is a necassary part of salat.

and allah ta3aala knows best
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#13 Astral

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Posted 20 March 2005 - 05:19 PM

oms,
no problems bro.. i think there was a slight misunderstanding.

You're right that some people say it totally wrong. I know of some Egyptian brother who says salamu aliakom. Even some moroccans say it wrong. I find it funny because they're the Arabs and should be spelling it transliterally correctly (did that make sense?).

When I'm on the net, I find it easier to read the latin arabic of non Arabs than Arabs themselves.

Anyway thats all a side issue... so back to the topic at hand... hmm..

peace out!
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#14 Sam

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Posted 20 March 2005 - 06:09 PM

I don't think there's a need to be pedantic. People have different accents but what they mean is the same.

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In the shafi'i madhhab, saying "salaamualaikum" when finishing the solat (ommitting the as-) invalidates the prayer if done intentionally (Reliance of the Traveller, f8.47, p144). Allah knows best.

salaams
sam

Edited by Sam, 20 March 2005 - 06:12 PM.

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#15 The Rationalist

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Posted 20 March 2005 - 09:29 PM

Thanks everyone. After 13 years I finally know the right pronunciation!

#16 Siham

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Posted 21 March 2005 - 01:46 PM

Anyway thats all a side issue... so back to the topic at hand... hmm..

peace out!

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:salam:

Okay back to giving salaams, having a cheerful and friendly face is a good characteristic which Islam encourages and considers to be a good deed which will bring reward, because a cheerful face mirrors a pure soul.

This inward and outward purity is one of the distinguishing feature of the sincere Muslim. Hence the Prophet Mohammed :saws: said:” Your smiling at your brother is an act of charity (sadaqah).” The Prophet was cheerful of countenance, always greeting his Sahabah with warmth and smiles whenever he saw them. as the great Sahabi Jarir bin Abdullah described: From the time I embraced Islam, the Messenger of Allah never refused to see me and he never saw me except with a smile on his face.

Islam wants the ties of friendship and brotherhood/sisterhood to remain strong among the Muslims, so it encouraged them to spread salaams, to be cheerful of countenance, to speak gently and to greet one another warmly, so that hearts will remain pure and open, ready to work together in kindness to do good deeds, and capable of carrying out the duties of Islam no matter what effort and sacrifices may be required.

wa'as-salam.

Edited by Siham, 21 March 2005 - 02:33 PM.

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#17 afroz

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Posted 21 March 2005 - 02:18 PM

In the shafi'i madhhab, saying "salaamualaikum" when finishing the solat (ommitting the as-) invalidates the prayer if done intentionally (Reliance of the Traveller, f8.47, p144). Allah knows best.


In Hanafi and Malik Madhab too. It is at least the view of the majority of scholars, and I would go as far saying that it is the position by unanimous consensus. The 'al (pronounced as-), has a very important context, and removal of it changes the meaning significantly, and hence the reason for invalidation of prayer due to the fact that the first Tasleem is a rukn of prayer.

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#18 oms

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Posted 23 March 2005 - 08:19 PM

In Hanafi and Malik Madhab too. It is at least the view of the majority of scholars, and I would go as far saying that it is the position by unanimous consensus. The 'al (pronounced as-), has a very important context, and removal of it changes the meaning significantly, and hence the reason for invalidation of prayer due to the fact that the first Tasleem is a rukn of prayer.

Was Salaam
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I was always taught that, in the hanafi madhab, the solat ends at the end of the tashahud, hence saying salams incorrectly does not invalidate the prayer...

perhaps i misunderstood that part??

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#19 Othman

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Posted 23 March 2005 - 09:33 PM

Seeing as the phrase is being discussed. Id like to aska question related but not quite. This is about the kum at the edn of 'Assalamu alaykum'. Gramatically, when speaking to one person it should be Alayk, not alaykum. Why is alaykum used? I was told it is out of respect. But my Arabic tutor at uni rejected this outright and ssaid it just came to be used that way. Not very convicing, I know.

So yea, I know that alaykum is the correct pronunction. Just wnat ot know, out of curiousity, why the grammatically correct usage isnt used.
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#20 oms

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Posted 23 March 2005 - 10:01 PM

Seeing as the phrase is being discussed. Id like to aska  question related but not quite. This is about the kum at the edn of 'Assalamu alaykum'. Gramatically, when speaking to one person it should be Alayk, not alaykum. Why is alaykum used? I was told it is out of respect. But my Arabic tutor at uni rejected this outright and ssaid it just came to be used that way. Not very convicing, I know.

So yea, I know that alaykum is the correct pronunction. Just wnat ot know, out of curiousity, why the grammatically correct usage isnt used.

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I believe its because your sending salams to the 2 angels (on your shulders)

and allah ta3aala knows best

Edited by oms, 23 March 2005 - 10:10 PM.

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#21 abyr

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Posted 23 March 2005 - 10:07 PM

brother Othman

as a sign of respect in the Arabic language, the plural is used..

e.g. if you are writing a business letter to someone you are familiar with... instead of using the singular of you [anta], th eplural is much better option [antom]..

gives it the sense of respect.....

salam
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#22 oms

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Posted 23 March 2005 - 10:18 PM

brother Othman

as a sign of respect in the Arabic language, the plural is used..

e.g. if you are writing a business letter to someone you are familiar with... instead of using the singular of you [anta], th eplural is much better option [antom]..

gives it the sense of respect.....

salam

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that would make more sense than what i said...
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#23 Seeker

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Posted 24 March 2005 - 12:28 AM

Not only is it said that way out of respect, but also because it's become so mainstream that it's used by default. On the other hand, you have "jazakumullahu khayr" (plural), which Arabs usually accomodate for the person they're addressing (jazak/jazaki for a single male/female).
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#24 oms

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Posted 24 March 2005 - 12:39 AM

brother Othman

as a sign of respect in the Arabic language, the plural is used..

e.g. if you are writing a business letter to someone you are familiar with... instead of using the singular of you [anta], th eplural is much better option [antom]..

gives it the sense of respect.....

salam

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true.

Allah ta3aallah uses it many times in the quran

"nahnu naqusu 3alayka.." surah yusuf (we reveal to you the best of stories...)

"inna nahnu nurithu al arda.." surat mariam (it us us/we that will inherit the earth...)

"innah nahnu nuhyi al mawta" surat yasin (we shall give life to the dead...)

etc etc etc....

im still not sure if thats the reason we say alaykom though...
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#25 Othman

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Posted 24 March 2005 - 07:15 AM

I dont think the Allah's usage of plural in referring to himself in relevant here. Thats used to show His Majesty and Power (subhanau wa ta'ala)

but yes, I was told it was said out of respect. But my Arabic tutor (christain, btw) didnt think so and some of her arguments were worthy of thought i have to say. Like, if its out of respect, why is it still used when addressing a child much younger than yourself, for example.
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#26 afroz

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Posted 24 March 2005 - 07:24 AM

The plural in the Assalaam Alaikum, is to the person, any other person who you may not be aware of his or her presence and to the unseen world.

Just like when you walk into an empty house and say Assalaam Alaikum............

Was Salaam
Afroz

Edited by afroz, 24 March 2005 - 07:26 AM.

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#27 afroz

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Posted 24 March 2005 - 07:31 AM

By tthe way, in response to the original post, there is a Hadeeth about people not saying Assalaam Alaikum to people beyond their own kin.

Rami's observation is quite true actually. I find this in Mosques so often these days, that people will not say the greeting to you and pass right by you, or when you say it to them, they stare at you considering a reply on the basis if they actually know you.

In particular on Eid, people will bump you out of the way to get to the friend 10 lines away, but will not greet you.

We are somewhat all to blame, but we must make conscious effort to say Assalaam Alaikum, and reply to it as well.

Was Salaam
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#28 abyr

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Posted 24 March 2005 - 07:41 AM

salam

Like, if its out of respect, why is it still used when addressing a child much younger than yourself, for example.


brothet... i think she got it wrong... to my knoweldge [which is minute... :D ] it's the child that initiates his/her greeting to his/her own teacher first...with the respected plural form... not the teacher to the child... and because the child used the respected plural form the teacher cannot and is incorect to use the singular form in reply....

u may need to ask someone else that is more learned in Arabic .. sorry :D

btw they have this familiar method in french as well....

wassalam
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#29 Moby

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Posted 24 March 2005 - 04:00 PM

btw they have this familiar method in french as well....


Yep, so it is. tu and vous.
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#30 CM786

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Posted 05 March 2010 - 01:36 PM

*bump* important topic MashaAllah :)

The Obligation of giving Salam

Allah (سبحانه وتعالى) says in the Quran:

يَا أَيُّهَا الَّذِينَ آمَنُوا لَا تَدْخُلُوا بُيُوتًا غَيْرَ بُيُوتِكُمْ حَتَّى تَسْتَأْنِسُوا وَتُسَلِّمُوا عَلَى أَهْلِهَا ذَلِكُمْ خَيْرٌ لَّكُمْ لَعَلَّكُمْ تَذَكَّرُونَ

O you who believe! Enter not houses other than your own, until you have asked permission and greeted those there in".

(Surah An-Noor: Verse 27)

فَإِذَا دَخَلْتُم بُيُوتًا فَسَلِّمُوا عَلَى أَنفُسِكُمْ تَحِيَّةً مِّنْ عِندِ اللَّهِ مُبَارَكَةً طَيِّبَةً

...But when you enter the houses, greet one another with a greeting from Allah: a greeting blessed and good...

(Surah An-Noor: verse 61)

وَإِذَا حُيِّيْتُم بِتَحِيَّةٍ فَحَيُّواْ بِأَحْسَنَ مِنْهَا أَوْ رُدُّوهَا

"When you are greeted with a greeting, greet in return with what is better than it, or (at least) return it equally..."

(Surah An-Nisa: verse 86)

When entering or leaving the house, one must acknowledge those inside by using the greetings of Muslims and the motto of Islam;

"May the peace and blessings of Allah be upon you"

The Prophet (صلى الله عليه وسلم) said:

"A Muslim owes another Muslim six duties. To greet him when he meets him, to accept when he gives him an invitation, to give him good counsel when he asks him for advice, to pray for mercy for him when he sneezes and says "Praise be to Allah" , to visit him when he is ill, and follow him (attend his funeral) when he dies".

We should not take preference of alternative greeting forms such as "Good Morning", "Good Evening", "Hello" or an arabic greeting such as sabah al khair/ marhaba/ ahlan wasahlan etc. in the place of this greeting. This greeting is the sign of Islam and the phrase the Messenger of Allah (صلى الله عليه وسلم) reccommended and used. The Messenger of Allah (صلى الله عليه وسلم) said to Anas (رضى الله عنه) :

"My son, greet you family when you enter your home, for that is a blessing for you and your family"

The Messenger of Allah (صلى الله عليه وسلم) also said:

"When one of you comes to an assembly, he should give the greeting. If he leaves he should give the greeting. Neither greeting is more deserving than the other."

(Al Adab Al Mufrad)

The greeting is deemed by many scholars to be wajib or sunnat ul mu'aqada whilst the reply is obligatory. So one is sinful for not giving salam. However when we make the intention to give greetings of salam we refer to 3; the person we meet, and the 2 angels. So the greeting of salam is of much greater value than "hi", "hello" etc, we have the intention of the dua'a which is multiple depending on the length of our salam and the degree to which we extend it. No matter whether our salam is given a reply by the person, the angels answer, so even when we enter an empty house, one should remember to make the greeting of salam.

So for example Asalamu-alaykum is plural, whilst Asalamu-alayka is the singular of the greeting. So in turn we should be generous with our greetings, we should when greeted reply with a greeting, a dua'a of equal or greater extent to gain extra reward.

In turn one must not be miserly with their reply. Abdullah Ibn 'Amr Ibn al-'As (رضى الله عنه)narrated:

"A liar is someone who lies in his oath. A miser is someone who is miserly with the greeting (of salam). A theif is someone who steals from the prayer (i.e. does not pray properly)."

One must always be gentle in their manner of greeting, as narrated in the hadith:

"Gentleness adorns every act. It's absence will tarnish it"
(Sahih Muslim)

Jabir Ibn Abdullah (رضى الله عنه) narrated:

"Some of the Jews greeted the Prophet (صلى الله عليه وسلم) saying, As-sam 'alaykum (Death be upon you) and the Prophet responded, And upon you. 'Aisha (رضى الله عنها), said angrily "Didn't you hear what he said?" The Prophet replied Yes and I answered them. We will be answered for what we said of them and they will not be answered for what they said to us".

So even with the non-muslims one must remember the correct adab that must be adopted.

Giving salam in certain situations is disliked, for example when you may disturb someone, when being taught, listening to the khutbah of salat-ul-jumu'ah, eating, sleeping, or in an important or private situation for example. However in other circumstances we should take heed and give salam, the Prophet (صلى الله عليه وسلم) said:

"By the One in Whose hand in my soul, you will not enter Paradise until you believe, and you will not believe until you love one another. Shall I not tell you of something that if you do it, you will love one another? Spread salam amongst yourselves."

(Muslim)

Imam Nawawi (رحمة الله عليه) said, "It is preferred to say Bismillah al-Rahman al-Rahim (In the name of Allah, Most Gracious, Most Merciful) when you enter your houses or the houses of others. You should say salam even if you enter vacant or uninhabited places and say a prayer to go out. It is narrated by Anas (رضى الله عنه) that the Prophet (صلى الله عليه وسلم) said:

"If someone says, 'In the name of Allah, I seek help from Allah. There is no strength nor might except with Allah', then he will be told ' You are protected my slave' and Satan will leave him."

(Tirmidhi & Abu Dawud)

He cited another hadith narrated by Muslim that Jabir Ibn Abdullah (رضى الله عنه) heard the Prophet (صلى الله عليه وسلم) say:

"If you enter your house and pray to Allah when entering and before your meals, Satan will say [to his minions] 'No sleep and no food'. If you enter without praying to Allah, Satan will say [to his minions], 'You have got your sleep and your meal'."

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